SCIENCE
STEWARDSHIP
SUSTAINABILITY
in Northwestern
Wyoming

2006 fieldwork partially supported by Dr. Kracker


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Locations of Visitors to www.greybull.org page since  October, 2008:

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LINKS
 Resilience Alliance
  Millennium Ecosys. Assmt.
  Shoshone National Forest
BLM Worland Field Office
BLM Cody Field Office
  Draper Museum Nat. Hist.
  Meeteetse, Wyoming

 

GREYBULL RIVER
SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY
(GRSLE)

 STOP LOOTING  CLASSES  MA THESES PHOTOS   RESEARCH

MISSION STATEMENT
Integrating natural and social sciences to promote ecological and economic sustainability through transdisciplinary research, education and stewardship initiatives


NEWEST MA THESES AVAILABLE

Bechberger 2010
BIOGEOMORPHIC PROCESSES AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE FORMATION
IN THE ABSAROKA MOUNTAINS OF NORTHWESTERN WYOMING

Archaeologists frequently associate Thomomys taploides, the Northern Pocket Gopher, with the loss of stratigraphic integrity. Disturbance from subsurface burrowing and the redistribution of sediment can result in both lateral and vertical movement of cultural material. However, fossorial activity does not necessarily negate the research potential of a site. Burrowing mammals may actually reveal previously unidentified archaeological sites, help land managers develop effective site testing plans and evaluate site significance, and contribute to a better understanding of a region’s archaeological record and past environmental conditions. This research explores the influence of pocket gopher activity on site formation at a high elevation prehistoric flaked stone scatter in the Absaroka Mountains of northwestern Wyoming (48PA2874). Archaeological data were examined in conjunction with pocket gopher behavioral patterns and geomorphic processes to better understand the affect of burrowing and sediment relocation on cultural material. This project provides a general background for further research on pocket gopher impacts to archaeological material in alpine settings. With additional research the effect of pocket gopher activity on artifact distribution in high elevation environments can be better understood.

Ollie 2008
LANDSCAPE CHANGE AND STABILITY IN THE ABSAROKA RANGE,
GREATER YELLOWSTONE ECOSYSTEM, WYOMING

The archaeological record in the Upper Greybull of northwestern Wyoming is an integral part of landscape dynamics. A dominant force across this region is landslides, and over 60% of archaeological sites in this study were found to be associated with remnant landslide features. These relationships are analyzed at two different spatial scales to better understand landscape evolution in the Upper Greybull. An investigation of site 48PA2811 shows the relationship between disturbance regimes, environmental change, and archaeological preservation at a local scale. This investigation included the documentation of surface and subsurface archaeological deposits, site geomorphology, physical and chemical soil analyses, site stratigraphy, and radiocarbon dating.

Reiser 2010
TREE-RINGS, HISTORIC DOCUMENTS, AND INTERPRETING PAST LANDUSE
AND ENVIRONMENTS IN THE UPPER GREYBULL RIVER WATERSHED,
NORTHWESTERN,
WYOMING
As a snapshot of ongoing research, this thesis presents tree-ring crossdating results for four historic cabins and associated structures collected prior to the Little Venus fire of 2006, including crossdates from a historic cabin that burned to the ground. Crossdating results are also presented for culturally modified trees in the area, including culturally peeled trees, and for a “ghost forest,” which may represent the remnants of an ancient forest that succumbed to fire in the late-1400s to mid- iv 1600s. Based on these crossdated samples, a preliminary standardized index of annual tree-ring growth, or master chronology, has been established which extends the tree-ring chronology back to 1260. This master chronology was then compared to historic documents from the region and accounts by early settlers of environmental conditions in the Upper Greybull River Watershed. This comparison has resulted in a more complex and nuanced understanding of past climate and human landuse, as well as highlighting stories about the past that only trees and historic accounts can tell. This thesis is part of an ongoing and urgent effort to collect, preserve and crossdate tree-ring samples from this fire-prone region. Like much of the West, forests in this area have been devastated by a recent bark beetle epidemic, posing a significant threat to cultural resources, especially those made of wood.

 

For other MA theses relating to this project, click here

GRSLE PROJECT
   Overview

LANDSCAPE TAPHONOMY
   Definition/Overview
   Graphic

BUNDLING & BRIDGING
   Definition
   Graphic 1
   Graphic 2

GREYBULL MA THESES
   MA Thesis Research

RESEARCH PAPERS:
  Plains Conference 2003
      Other 2003 Papers
  Plains Conference 2004
      Other 2004 Papers

  Plains Conference 2005
      Other 2005 Papers
  Plains Conference 2006
      Other 2006 Papers
  Plains Conference 2007
      Other 2007 Papers
  Plains Conference 2008
       Other 2008 Papers
 
FIELD CLASS 2008
  Overview
 
Reading Assignments

 PHOTO GALLERIES
  2003 photos
  2004 photos

  2005 photos
  2006 photos

  2007 photos

SITE DOCUMENTATION
  In-Field Artifact Codes (pdf)
  Summary Data
 
Summer 2005 Fieldwork
  Summer 2006 Fieldwork 


  With its headwaters  high in the Washakie Wilderness, northwestern Wyoming's Big Horn Basin, the upper Greybull River travels through some of the most remote backcountry within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.   Along its 145 km (90 mile) corridor, the Greybull's waters move from elevations over 3960 m (13,000 ft) in the heart of the Absaroka Mountains, to only 1370 m (4500 ft) at its confluence with the Bighorn River. 

     For at least the last 13,000 years, humans have been an active part of the Greybull River ecosystem.  For most of this time, mobile hunter-gatherers traversed the area .and have left a complex record of their changing interactions with their biological, physical, and social environments.  For nearly the last 150 years, a new form of human-landscape interactions -- livestock grazing, agriculture, and gas and oil exploration and production have--have created a different series of interactions.  


Visitors --Hit Counter Since 12 Sept. 2005

For additional information contact:
 lctodd@grsle.org

Last Updated: Wednesday April 07, 2010

GRSLE project supervised by
L.C. Todd   http://humanpaleo.org/Todd.htm

 

  At the beginning of the 21st Century there are indications that yet another major set changes can be expected in the ways humans and the Greybull River landscapes interact.  The larger ranches are becoming a thing of the past, livestock numbers are declining, recreational uses of the the area are increasing, and a new series of human-landscape linkages are being forged. 

    The Greybull River Sustainable Landscape Ecology (GRSLE) project seeks a deeper understanding of each of these multi-faceted landscapes: the prehistoric, the historic/contemporary, and the series of alternative futures that lay ahead.  The heart of this project is an archaeological perspective on landscapes, which begins with the premise that all landscapes are the result a richly interwoven series of cultural, biological, and abiotic processes that have left multiple records of the their combined interactions.

These WebPages provide an introduction to GRSLE's long-term goals, objectives, and recent investigations.   We hope that our attempts to combine science and stewardship will aid in the development of sustainable ecological and economic futures for this remarkable drainage system and that the Greybull may be an important component in helping to preserve the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, it's lands, it's wildlife, it's vegetation, soils, waters, and peoples.

CONTACT
 
Larry Todd    lctodd@grsle.org

Todd CV